Home Weather Weather Blog
Rainy Days and Then Not
Thursday, 07 July 2011 19:57
It's been two weeks since I've posted. I am trying to do better but apparently failing. A lot has gone on. Instead of trying to catch up with everything, I will just post a chronological order of Watches, Warnings, and Special Weather Statements. That should tell the tale as well as I can.

10:49 a.m. June 30 - Heat Advisory

Heat advisory in effect from noon Friday to midnight CDT Friday night...

The National Weather Service in Chicago has issued a heat advisory...which is in effect from noon Friday to midnight CDT Friday night.

* Temps/heat index...temperatures across the advisory area are forecast to reach the middle and upper 90s...with high humidity contributing to heat index values of around 105 degrees.

* Impacts...the combination of heat and humidity will create oppressive conditions which may cause heat related illnesses to develop with prolonged exposure.

Ed. The heat advisory was repeated several times, every few hours. As you'll see, it was completely in vain.

6:32 p.m. June 30 - Special Statement
Significant weather alert for Eastern Lake and western Porter counties until 700 PM CDT...

At 628 PM...National Weather Service Doppler radar indicated a strong thunderstorm near Wheeler...moving south at 25 mph.

Nickel sized hail and wind gusts to 50 mph are possible with this storm.

8:16 p.m. June 30 - Severe Thunderstorm Watch

8:41 p.m. June 30 - Severe Thunderstorm Warning
* at 836 PM CDT...National Weather Service Doppler radar indicated a line of severe thunderstorms capable of producing ping pong ball size hail...and damaging winds in excess of 60 mph.  These storms were located along a line extending from Oak Park to 7 miles east of Hyde Park to 10 miles northeast of Whiting to 10 miles northwest of Beverly Shores...and moving south at 30 mph.

9:19 and 9:40 p.m. June 30 - Severe Thunderstorm Warning
* at 917 PM CDT...National Weather Service Doppler radar indicated a line of severe thunderstorms capable of producing damaging winds in excess of 60 mph.  These storms were located along a line extending from Richton Park to St. John to Merrillville... and moving south at 40 mph.

10:15 p.m. June 30 - Severe Thunderstorm Warning
* at 1008 PM CDT...National Weather Service Doppler radar indicated a line of severe thunderstorms capable of producing quarter size hail... and damaging winds in excess of 60 mph.  These storms were located along a line extending from Schererville to Sauk Village to Hazel Crest...and moving south at 40 mph.

Ed. That's four (three and a re-issue) Severe Storm Warnings and a Special Weather Statement all in one evening, on a day when we were not expecting any severe weather. The region wasn't in any severe delineation, but near a "see text" on the Day 1 Outlooks and also under a five-percent non-delineated severe area.

3:11 a.m. July 1 - Special Weather Statement
At 306 am...National Weather Service Doppler radar indicated a strong thunderstorm 3 miles northwest of Lake Station...moving south at  30 mph.

Nickel size hail...frequent cloud to ground lightning...brief moderate downpours...are possible with this storm.

Ed. This storm dropped some hail large enough to wake me up. I grabbed my ruler and started out to measure, but as soon as I flipped the switch to turn on my front porch light, the power went out. Sleepy and bewildered, it took me a few moments to realize what happened. The power came back on after only half a minute or so, but by the time I got outside to check, I saw no hail.

3:31 a.m. July 1 - Special Weather Statement
At 329 am...National Weather Service Doppler radar indicated a strong thunderstorm near Lake Dalecarlia... moving south at 35 mph.

Nickel size hail...winds greater than 40 mph... frequent cloud to ground lightning...brief moderate downpours...are possible with this storm.

6:17 a.m. July 1 - Severe Thunderstorm Warning
* at 611 am CDT...trained weather spotters reported a severe thunderstorm producing quarter size hail.  This storm was located near Lakes of the Four Seasons...and moving southeast at 25 mph.
At 610 am CDT...quarter sized hail was reported in Crown Point with this storm.

11:18 a.m. July 1 - Heat Advisory (update)
The heat advisory, originally set to go into effect at noon, is pushed back to 3:00 p.m.

1:13 p.m. July 1 - Special Weather Statement
At 110 PM...National Weather Service Doppler radar indicated an area of strong thunderstorms moving onshore off Lake Michigan from the far southeast side of Chicago to Ogden Dunes...moving south at 10 mph.

1:15 p.m. July 1 - Severe Thunderstorm Warning
* at 110 PM CDT...National Weather Service Doppler radar indicated a severe thunderstorm capable of producing quarter size hail...and damaging winds in excess of 60 mph.  This storm was located 5 miles northeast of East Chicago...and moving south at 20 mph.

1:43 p.m. July 1 - Heat Advisory (update)
The heat advisory is cancelled. But it won't stop raining!

3:22 p.m. July 1 - Nowcast

Now through 430 PM CDT...strong winds...possibly gusting over 40 mph... will occur over Northwest Indiana and east central Illinois in the wake of an area of rapidly diminishing thunderstorms.

2:49 p.m. July 2 - Severe Thunderstorm Watch
For "Hail to 1.5 inches in diameter...thunderstorm wind gusts to 75 mph... and dangerous lightning". We didn't get a drop. All of the convection initiated to our south and east. Areas of northwest central Indiana received huge rain totals, as the slow moving rain heavy storms trained over the same areas.

So June 30 through July 1 was a very active couple of days for us, with 3.26 inches of rain in just those two days. And so far it hasn't rained since, six days later - one of the longest dry spells we've had all year. My June precipitation total is 4.33 inches, not counting the rain on June 30 (because that isn't reported until July 1, it goes into my July total), 0.14 inches shy of the June average for Merrillville. But the average precipitation drops off sharply for July, with 3.52 inches on average. We only need 0.27 inches in the next three and a half weeks to break the July average.
 
Special Watch Warning
Wednesday, 22 June 2011 23:22
My inability to keep up with the weather continues. Weather is there, motivation is there, time and energy are not.

We had a couple of blog worthy episodes in the last week. Monday morning started early with a batch of strong storms moving through the area. The Forecast Discussion the night before explained that a mesoscale convective system that formed over the Central Plains would likely move east into the region overnight. This was indeed the case. I woke up early and checked the radar to see that most of northern and western Illinois was under a Severe Thunderstorm Watch, with a few warned clusters of storms moving our way. We received a Severe Thunderstorm Warning at 6:47 a.m. The storms moved through with little effect other than dropping about a quarter inch of rain. This was the first measurable precipitation we had in three days, almost a record stretch of dry for the month.

The bigger event for The Region occurred last night when more severe storms rolled through. A Severe Thunderstorm Watch was issued just before 6:00 p.m. for most of northern Illinois and our little corner of Indiana. At 7:24 p.m. a Special Weather Statement was issued for a line of strong storms. An hour later the northern half of our county was warned for "a line of severe thunderstorms capable of producing destructive hurricane force winds locally in excess of 80 mph." We had enough wind to blow quite a few small branches and bunches of leaves from the trees and to topple over a sizable branch from one of the hollow apple trees. But we only received a tenth of an inch of rain from the storms and the periodic light showers we experienced throughout the day. A few local storm reports reported strong winds in excess of 60 mph, including non-thunderstorm gusts. But northeast Illinois experienced the worst of the storms with two confirmed tornadoes and some significant straight line wind damage.

Yesterday was the last in a long stretch of potential severe weather days. Despite the potential, we again escaped unscathed, and actually received very little rain - only 0.34 inches - since the big precipitation drop on the 14th through early morning on the 16th. The forecast calls for chances of rain and/or storms for at least the next six days, although the potential drops off considerably Friday and Saturday before ramping up early next week again. Temperatures are expected to be seasonally pleasant, with highs ranging from the high 60s to upper 70s by early next week.

June 21st Suburban Chicago Tornadoes

Tuesday June 21 Severe Storms
 
What's That I Hear?
Thursday, 16 June 2011 23:20
The weekend and early part of the week were quite pleasant, with comfortable temperatures and a much needed reprieve from rain. However, that didn't last long. We received another inch of rain in the last two days, 0.33 on June 14 and 0.67 on the 15th through this morning. The rest of today has been pleasant and dry despite a chance for showers and storms. More rain and storms are forecast for the next few days as an active front stalls over the region. We are in the NWS's Slight Area for severe weather the next two days at least. We're already at 3.91 inches of precipitation for the month, and June is only half over. Unless we get an extended period of dry weather, June looks to be another record breaking month for precipitation. The average June total for our town is 4.47 inches.

Yesterday was a rainy, stormy day. The rain came and went throughout the day. After an early batch of morning storms, we had a short period of dry weather until more rain and storms started popping up in the afternoon. Some of the storms looked rain heavy on the radar, but not particularly sinister. I left for band practice around 6:00 p.m., and a radar check right before I left showed some more heavy rain producing storms approaching our county with a slight uptick in severity as they neared.

On the way to practice I thought I heard what could have been a tornado siren sounding. The sound was very vague and intermittent. The town I was traveling through is heavily populated, and the sound would cut out and reappear as I passed small open areas between houses and trees. I scanned the sky but didn't see anything troubling. I kept hearing the sound for at least five minutes. When I arrived at practice, I realized there were train tracks a little north of my friend's house and a train was passing. I assumed I was hearing the train. While at practice, there was a short period of heavy rain but nothing sinister.

When I got home and checked email I was surprised to see that we received two tornado warnings and a Special Weather Statement for strong storms with possible funnel clouds and brief tornadoes. The Chicago NWS Office confirmed one brief EF0 tornado in northeast Illinois and a couple other possible tornadoes nearby, but their survey isn't concluded yet.

Along with more rain and storms, the temperature is expected to rise a few degrees each day, from a high of 75 tomorrow to the upper 80s by Monday.

Honeywell has been driving me crazy lately. It behaved so well all winter. I hardly had to mess with it. But the last few weeks have been a constant battle with the sensors. Lately it has been dropping the sensor signals more than not, especially the outdoor temperature/humidity sensor. I changed batteries and even moved the sensor to what I hope is a better location, but the darn thing refues to cooperate. It is making me grumpy to the point of apathy. The random, pointless beeping also has returned, although it will behave for extended periods of time. I have found that I can control it somewhat just by moving the unit around on the shelf. If I find just the right spot, I can stop the beeping, but it will eventually return. I'm thinking about resetting the entire unit, sensors and all, and adding an additional antenna. I don't know if that will help, but I don't know what else to try.
 
I Can't Keep Up
Saturday, 11 June 2011 10:15
The weather has been active this week, and so have I. We had a bit of severe weather, lots more completely unneeded rain, and severe storms in the northeast prompting another PSWO.

We've been in or near slight areas for severe outlined on the NWS Outlooks much of this week. A slow moving, sometimes static front has been meandering back and forth bringing almost daily chances for rain and storms. We only received rain two days this week, but over an inch each time - 1.31 inches on June 8 followed by another 1.03 inches on June 9. I haven't done the math lately but this brings our spring precipitation total to a LOT, record totals by most accounts.

We received one Severe Thunderstorm morning in the wee hours on June 9. Strong storms rolled in across northern Illinois. No watches were issued for our area, but one lone storm strengthened enough to warrant a warning at 3:14 a.m. on June 9. My little Oregon Scientific woke me up just enough to blurringly stare at the radio for a minute. The situation didn't look that significant, and the warning was for the northern half of the county, which just included us. The storm passed with little effect and I went back to sleep.

Yesterday was supposed to be our greatest chance for severe weather this week. The major contributing factor was how far north the aforementioned front would move. Fortunately for us, it didn't quite make it this far north. A small area of severe storms with isolated warnings moved through central Illinois and into Indiana several counties to our south, and a large chunk of the country from northwest Texas and Oklahoma northeast through Illinois, central Indiana, and all the way up to northern New England was outlined with Severe Storm Watches. The storm warnings were scattered, and I haven't seen anything in the way of significant reports, even though there were a few spotty tornado warnings as well.

The forecast for today and tomorrow calls for beautiful weather, with highs in the mid 60s and little to no rain in sight. The coming week looks pretty nice, with temperatures slowly rising to the upper 70s by the end of the week, but with returning chances for rain and storms mid week.
 
June Begins
Monday, 06 June 2011 11:53
More severe weather rolled through the region last week. The last day of May found us just on the western edge of a Moderate area for severe weather. A Severe Thunderstorm Watch was issued around 2:30 in the afternoon. A line of strong storms passed over the region with no warnings and only one Special Weather Statement. I didn't even register any precipitation that day. A look at the radar shows a small dry patch passing over the central parts of the county surrounded by storms on the north and south.

A more significant event occurred last Saturday. The area was only in a Slight area for severe. Another Severe Thunderstorm Watch was issued for much of Indiana.  Around 4:00 that afternoon, all of northwest Indiana was under several Severe Thunderstorm Warnings. A Tornado Warning was issued on the border between the counties east and southeast of us. Our town caught the very northern edge of the storm complex, only receiving a little gusty wind and 0.22 inches of rain. However, the storms caused a large swath of damage in communities to our south and southeast, with straight line winds between 90-110 mph. Hundreds of trees were reported down, along with some small structure damage.

Below are some links to NWS pages about the June 4 severe weather.
4 June 2011 Severe Weather Review
Damage Survey of June 4 Storms over Northwest IN

Today is the first day of our mini heat wave. Temperatures are expected to top 90 degrees today with the heat index possibly breaking 100 in some areas. Tomorrow and Wednesday are expected to be even hotter with mid 90s temperatures and the heat index around 105. The forecast has slight chances of showers and thunderstorms all week, but the best chance comes Wednesday night into Thursday as another cold front comes through pushing the temperatures back to more seasonable levels in the mid 70s and then upper 60s by the weekend. We're not currently in any severe areas other than a five-percent potential around the current delineated areas, although Wednesday's Outlook has much of northern and northwest Illinois in a Slight area for severe storms.

The Chicago NWS posted both the May and Spring "Look Backs". In general, we've experienced mostly average temperatures despite breaking a few records for heat. Areas south and east of Chicago have been abnormally wet, while areas north and west have been around average.
A LOOK BACK AT THE CLIMATE FOR THE MONTH OF MAY 2011 FOR CHICAGO AND ROCKFORD...

AT CHICAGO...THE AVERAGE HIGH TEMPERATURE WAS 67.8 DEGREES WHICH IS2.1 DEGREES BELOW NORMAL.  THE AVERAGE LOW TEMPERATURE WAS 48.0 DEGREES WHICH IS 0.5 DEGREE ABOVE NORMAL.  THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 57.9 DEGREES WHICH IS 0.8 DEGREES BELOW NORMAL. 7.27 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION WAS RECORDED WHICH IS 3.89 INCHES ABOVE NORMAL. A TRACE OF SNOW...IN THE FORM OF HAIL...WAS RECORDED WHICH IS NORMAL.

THE HIGH OF 90 DEGREES ON MAY 10 SET A RECORD HIGH FOR THAT DAY...BREAKING THE OLD RECORD OF 89 SET IN 1896. ALSO...MAY 2011 IS THE THIRD WETTEST MAY ON RECORD.

AT ROCKFORD...THE AVERAGE HIGH TEMPERATURE WAS 70.4 DEGREES WHICH IS 0.8 DEGREES BELOW NORMAL.  THE AVERAGE LOW TEMPERATURE WAS 48.9 DEGREES WHICH IS 1.0 DEGREE ABOVE NORMAL.  THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE FOR THE MONTH WAS 59.7 DEGREES WHICH IS 0.1 DEGREE ABOVE NORMAL. 3.94 INCHES OF PRECIPITATION WAS RECORDED WHICH IS 0.09 INCHES BELOW NORMAL. A TRACE OF SNOW...IN THE FORM OF HAIL...WAS RECORDED WHICH IS NORMAL.

THE HIGH TEMPERATURE OF 91 DEGREES ON MAY 10 TIED THE RECORD FOR THAT DAY SET IN 1922.
THE HIGH TEMPERATURE OF 91 DEGREES ON MAY 11 BROKE THE OLD RECORD OF 90 FOR THAT DAY SET IN 1922.

A look back at the climate for Spring 2011 for Chicago and Rockford...

At Chicago... the average high temperature for the season was 55.9 degrees which is 2.1 degrees below the 1971 to 2000 average. The average low temperature was 38.7 degrees which is 0.8 degrees above the 1971 to 2000 average. Overall... the average temperature for the season was 47.3 degrees which is 0.6 degrees below normal.

A total of 14.79 inches of precipitation was recorded during this past Spring... which is 5.08 inches above normal. This ranks as being the 6th wettest Spring on record in Chicago dating back to 1871. Roughly half of this 14.79 inches... or 7.27 inches... was recorded during the month of May. This ranked the month of May as the 3rd wettest on record. There was also a total of 1.6 inches of snow that was recorded at O’Hare in March and April.

At Rockford... the average high temperature was 58.1 degrees which is 0.5 degrees below normal. The average low temperature was 39.2 degrees which is 2.1 degrees above normal. Overall... the average temperature for the season was 48.6 degrees which is 0.7 degrees above normal.

A total of 10.75 inches of precipitation was recorded during this past Spring... which was only 0.71 inches above normal. In addition... a total of 0.1 inches of snow was reported.
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 6 of 43
Weather Underground PWS KINMERRI5

Weather Underground PWS KINMERRI5

Click for Merrillville, Indiana Forecast

Archive

Site Info

My interests


CoCoRaHS
Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network
My Station #: IN-LK-33

Merrillville Noon Kiwanis
I'm the administrator and a board member.

Freecycle
Giving (and getting) stuff for free - reuse and keep good stuff out of landfills.